Graffiti, and What It Meant To Me

I'll get right to the point - I was once a devoted graffiti writer. Since I was a kid, art had always been a part of my life. I remember choosing to stay in and draw, over playing tag with the neighborhood kids. In third grade, I became entrepreneurial and began to sell my drawings of cars for $3. By middle school, I was obsessed with Dragon Ball Z and Pokemon, and I had a sketchbook dedicated to each series. Every page, dedicated to each character. I'm glad to say I still have those books.

In high school, graffiti bursted into popularity as a dominant trend, instantly grabbing my attention. Naturally, I sucked at it. But as time passed, my skill progressed, and I met more of the right (or, wrong) people. I got involved with older, respected writers, and they took me in as "the little guy with good can control".

 
 

Driving down a freeway and seeing something you did you knew you weren't supposed to, shining high and bright for the world to see, delivered a satisfaction that is incomparable. As the years went on, documenting my work (legal or illegal) became a priority. Having been arrested twice, and having seen most, if not all of the walls I painted get buffed, I felt the only way to hold a memory of my creations was through photographs and film. The only reason I ever purchased a camera in the first place, was to capture what I knew was not going to live much longer.

 
 

Photography, Filmmaking, and Design, the things I cannot imagine my life without, were born from a love of immortalizing what I did with a couple of spray paint cans. From running around the dark streets of Los Angeles, to photographing a wedding, filming a music video, and designing the brand identity of a city... I tend to credit graffiti for being the "seed" that spurred my creative career.

Now, I'm not saying I was the best. But graffiti has played a vital role in my life that I tend to easily look over. I don't need to do that anymore.

Honestly, this isn't even half of the ruckus I caused, but... You get the point. Thanks for reading!